17 Best Places to Visit in Norway

Martina Rosado
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Alta

This unique city is located on the ridge of a mountain range. Alta is also the gateway to the Hardangervidda mountain plateau. Additionally, the city is the home of the original 1936 S…ndenfj…rden wooden house, one of Europe’s oldest wooden houses.

Arendal

A comfy seaside town in southern Norway that serves as the gateway to the Festningsfjorden. Festningsfjorden is the natural harbor, and the city of Arendal dates back to 1150 AD. It’s a town of cobbled streets, quaint cafes, and a pink-stone cathedral.

Arendal is the capital of Aust-Agder county, and it also houses Norway’s highest point, Moelvenkollen, which stands at 804 meters. Legend has it that Odin, the Norse god, leapt over the mountain centuries ago to arrive at Arendal’s harbor.

This graffiti-covered elevator in Arendal is a reminder of the intense battles that were fought on the Festningsfjorden.

There are several attractions worth visiting in this seaside town, including the harbor, the Festningsfjorden, and the Kulturhuset festival hall that serves as one of the primary concert venues for pop stars.

A staircase in the harbor area of Arendal is lined with rustic graffiti that hints at the turbulent times when the Festningsfjorden saw a lot of naval warfare.

Nordkapp

Nordkapp is among the most popular destinations in Norway and one of the best kept secrets of the country. This place is not just a stunner, but it has a phenomenal amount of beauty.

It is located right at the Arctic Circle and you are about 4 hours away from the border of the USSR. The coastal landscapes are magnificent and the landscape is medievally pretty with its monasteries, churches and pretty villages.

Several companies offer helicopter transfers which can be even worth it if you are planning to combine it with a snowmobile tour for a truly epic experience. Nordkapp is a place to see, it is where you can meet some real Vikings.

If you are into the best bit of history to be found in this part of Europe, then you must visit this place. If you wish to see the beauty of nature and breathe in the fresh air then this is the perfect place.

Roros

The highest natural point in Norway; located 63 km from Bergen, it offers a great view, which you can see from a small bird observatory in the village. Nature is always close to the people of this village, which produces and exports 90 percent of Norway’s vegetable oil, olives, garlic, asparagus, woad and ”mountain cheese.”

When you visit this particular place, you will be able to see the Rauma fjord, which is surrounded by mountains. It is a perfect place to get a day of hiking and camping in the fjord; you can also visit Rognan to see its amazing carnival, participate in river rafting and go horse riding along the Rauma river.

Bodo

(Honnete Hauge):

Bodo is a village in the municipality of Austevoll in Hordaland county, Norway. It is located on the island of Austevolløy, near the island of Askøy in the north of the Stavanger Peninsula. The village has a population (2013) of 3,938; giving the village a population density of 2,756 inhabitants per Km 2 .

Jostedalsbreen National Park

Alesund

This gorgeous little mountain town in the northern part of Norway is best known for its UNESCO World Heritage listed Old Church. A photographer’s dream come true, the church was entirely built without any nails, relying on the natural strength of the stone to hold everything together. If you’re just after some peace and quiet to retreat to, Aalesund is also a fantastically scenic base to explore the surrounding peaks and fjords.

Molde – Colourful home of Vikings

Molde is the coolest city in Norway. Probably. It’s a port in the far north, so what’s not to like? From its brightly painted houses and Viking history, to its amazing natural surroundings and fabulous views, Molde is one of the best places in Norway for natural beauty.

Bergen – Sailing out into the fjord

Tromso

Tromso is the largest city in Northern Norway. It sits on the Arctic Circle and has become an international center for both tourism and business. As a result, you’re going to find that Tromso has the most restaurants, shops and entertainment venues of any other place in the entire country.

The city’s main industry is tourism primarily due to it being a marina and a port and also for being the closest town to the North Pole. Not only is it worldwide recognizable because of books, comics, and movies but now you can go there personally. The city has a very mild climate but stay very cold year round.

Trondheim

Housing a population of around 40,000, Trondheim is the second largest city in Norway. The site of the capital of Norway until the capital moved to Oslo in 1847, Trondheim has a long history that has shaped the society and culture of the city. The Trondheim Cathedral is still the seat of the archbishop of the Church of Norway, and the Nidaros Cathedral stands as testimony to centuries of history in the city. In addition to sights in the city, Trondheim is also known for the Sognefjord and its fjord scenery.

The Sognefjord stretches for 72 miles and was recently awarded UNESCO World Heritage Status. This stunning and incredibly unique hiking trail that runs through four counties and was formed by glaciers flowing from the Norwegian Arctic is considered to be by many to be the best hiking trail in Norway.

There are many different hiking trails and outdoor activities throughout the city that can be enjoyed year round. Trondheim also has an active theater scene, the Trondheim Symphony Orchestra, the city festival, an open-air museum, and about 24 nature reserves.

Oslo

Sognefjord

Stavanger

Known as “The Cultural Capital of Norway,” Stavanger has been voted as one of the most cultural places to visit in the country. This charming city is split across the Hardangerfjord on a peninsula. The city is surrounded by mountains, fjords, and the Atlantic Ocean.

There are many things to do in Stavanger, and you can easily spend a day exploring the city. Luckily, there are numerous activities you can do that will leave you with memories to last a lifetime.

The best way to make the most out of your visit to Stavanger is to check out the town in the morning, and then spend the afternoon engaged in the activities in the evening.

Downtown Stavanger

One of the best ways to start the morning is at the District Vestkanten in Stavanger. Here, you will find a number of shops, boutiques, and cafes. Some of the places that have been recommended as the best cafes in the city include a number of shops and galleries.

One shop has been suggested by locals as one of the best in town, with pieces by various artisans. This is the unofficial restaurant of Stavanger, with a number of items to choose from on the menu.

Svalbard

Norway.

The Svalbard archipelago is actually located in the Arctic, not the Arctic Ocean like you might think. Svalbard is made up of Norway’s Spitsbergen, Iceland’s Bjørå, and Russia’s Franz Josef Land.

The island is presently a territory of Norway, although it is politically and geographically considered part of the Kingdom of Norway.

Despite being a Norwegian territory, Svalbard is not heavily populated. Although the Norwegian government encourages tourism, the population of Svalbard remains a mere 2,000, spread across all of the islands.

All incoming research staff and tourists to Svalbard are required to undergo a background check. Visitors can only leave the territory on planes or ships that will return them back to Svalbard.

Svalbard is mostly free of humans, with the exception of research staff and visitors, and thus is mostly free from the rain, fog, and wet snow that make up the Arctic’s weather patterns.

Since Svalbard is located just above the Arctic Circle, the sun stays in the sky throughout the entire twenty-four-hour day. The sun at noon illuminates the ground directly. Since the sun never sets, Svalbard is twenty-four-hours of sunlight.

Jotunheimen National Park

If you’ve ever wanted to explore the homes of Norse Gods, this is the place to do it! Located in the center of the country, you have the option of hiking or cycling around this stunning countryside and enjoy tiny villages along your way.

Take a trip to the hills and canyons of Jotunheimen National Park with your friend Winston, who will be your guide. If you’ve been following our series “17 Best Places to Visit in the World,” you know that you’re in for a real adventure! This is why Jotunheimen National Park (Norway) is number 4 on our list.

This park is full of epic scenery, and it’s one of Norway’s most popular tourist sites. In fact, it’s the country’s second most visited national park with 25% of the tourist visitations in the entire country.

If you’re the outdoorsy type, you’ll want to explore the park via hiking and cycling. In fact, almost 100% of the park is accessible for these travel options. The high altitude also makes the park an amazing place for skiing during the winter.

Bergen

With clusters of Dutch houses, striking buildings on Gamle Bergen, and a bohemian atmosphere that seems to date back to the 1800s, the city of Bergen is one of Europe’s must-see cities. During the dark nights of winter, Bergen is the northernmost city in the world with any light at all. This makes rendezvous with the backdrop of the city’s iconic rays of sunshine elusive. However, it is indeed possible to enjoy what Bergen has to offer, from visiting a local craft fair to a chance encounter with the wild backcountry. By visiting Bergen, you’ll be touching historically and naturally rich ground and viewing probably one of the finest natural phenomena that nature has bestowed on Norway. Bergen is also the gateway to picturesque fjords and hiking trails, and even its own UNESCO World Heritage Site, Lillehammer.

From the city’s shops, galleries, and restaurants, to its historic buildings and gardens, you’ll want to make time to make your way to Bergen. Travel to Bergen is not as complex as some other European destinations, and there are numerous flights leaving from destinations around the world. You’ll find ferries crossing the fjords, too.

Lofoten Islands

Geirangerfjord

The Geirangerfjord and the valley of Dalsnibba are situated in a beautiful location just 6km west of the village of Geiranger. There are steep cliffs on the northern and southern sides, respectively, and they are bordered by very high, snow-covered mountains. In the middle of this natural beauty, you’ll find Geirangerfjord with its idyllic, white- washed cottages and small, isolated settlements at the water’s edge.

Geirangerfjord is a coastal fjord. It consists of a narrow entrance and a long narrow fjord, 30km (18.6 miles) in length, with steep walls. It is unique because of its bizarre shape of a neck with a big hill with a chain of peaks and steep, sharp ridges at the mouth of the gorge at the north end of the fjord.

This fjord is the main tourist attraction in Vestfjord. It has a relatively easy road from Geiranger all the way to the narrowest section of the fjord, Dalsnibba, and the small community of Stryn.

Map of Norway

The Kingdom of Norway comprises the western part of Scandinavia. This is a country with a rich cultural heritage and a wide range of attractions. Norway offers the best of both urban life and rural splendour.

It’s also a country with great natural beauty, offering stunning scenery attaining an altitude of over one thousand metres above the sea level. The land area of Norway is about 694,000 square kilometres. The western coastline is part of the Arctic Ocean. The northern tip in the Arctic is virtually inaccessible because of the Arctic Ocean. And yet, the climate in Norway can be very different from the rest of the country.

Due to the strong influence of the Gulf Stream and North Atlantic currents, the north of Norway enjoys mild winters and warm summers. While the winters are relatively mild and moist, snowfall is common in the mountains throughout the year. The maritime climate of the country offers great opportunities to enjoy the sites of bright beaches, forested shore or endless white ocean.

Norway has more than 100,000 parks, forests, historic sites, monuments, etc. In Norway, it’s often snowing during summer and raining during winter. The best time to visit Norway is June to August or September to November.